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Recommended Carbonate Related Publications

 
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Bjarne Rafaelsen
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Joined: 14 Mar 2004
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Location: Harstad

PostPosted: 27 Feb 2008 09:17    Post subject: Recommended Carbonate Related Publications Reply with quote

This new feature titled Recommended Carbonate Related Publications will be added in the upcoming Carbonate Network e-mails. The aim of this new feature is to spread the word about publications that are interesting in a broad sense, interesting in a narrow sense, extreme in some direction or just well written/illustrated. You may also “advertise” a publication you or some of your colleagues have contributed to.

I encourage you all to contribute to this new feature. Post the title and reference of any publication (paper, book, e-learning, PhD thesis, etc.) you wish to share with The Carbonate Network members in this forum or e-mail it to brafaelsen@hotmail.com (please title the e-mail Recommended Carbonate Related Publications). Add a line or two why you find this publication interesting. All posted information will be from anonymous sources unless you wish your name to be stated. Please use bold text in the title of the publication.

Examples:

“Stemmerik, L., Worsley, D., 2005. 30 years on – Arctic Upper Palaeozoic stratigraphy, depositional evolution and hydrocarbon prospectivity. Norwegian Journal of Geology 85, 151-168.

This paper is well written and provides a good and pedagogic overview of the Arctic Upper Palaeozoic stratigraphy.”

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“Reid, C.M., James, N.P., Kyser, T.K., Barrett, N. and Hirst, A.J. 2008: Modern estuarine siliceous spiculites, Tasmania, Australia: A non-polar link to Phanerozoic spiculitic cherts. Geology, v. 36, p. 107-110.

Biosiliceous sedimentary rocks are well known from the geologic record. This paper provides a modern analogue to shallow non-polar spiculites, using the estuarine system in Bathurst Harbour, southwest Tasmania.”

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Last edited by Bjarne Rafaelsen on 27 Apr 2008 14:31; edited 3 times in total
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Bjarne Rafaelsen
Site Admin


Joined: 14 Mar 2004
Posts: 325
Location: Harstad

PostPosted: 27 Apr 2008 14:29    Post subject: Unusual Holocene and late Pleistocene carbonate sedimentatio Reply with quote

Dean, W., Rosenbaum, J., Skipp, G., Colman, S., Forester, R., Liu, A., Simmons, K., and Bischoff, J., 2006, Unusual Holocene and late Pleistocene carbonate sedimentation in Bear Lake, Utah and Idaho, U.S.A.: Sedimentary Geology, v. 185, p. 93-112.

This high elevation, high latitude, cold, snow-pack-fed lake pecipitated aragonite for most of the Holocene, with periods of low-Mg calcite. In 1911, the Bear River was diverted into the lake, lowered the salinity and, more importantly, the Mg/Ca ratio so that today the lake precipitates high-Mg calcite.

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Dean, W. E., Forester, R. M., Bright, J., and Anderson, R.Y., 2007, Influence of the diversion of Bear River into Bear Lake (Utah and Idaho) on the environment of deposition of carbonate minerals: Evidence from water and sediments: Limnology and Oceanography, v. 52, p. 1094-111

The diversion of Bear River into Bear Lake in 1911 drastically changed the water chemistry of the lake, particularly lowering the Mg/Ca ratio, such that the lake went from precipitating aragonite to precipitating high-Mg calcite. However, the surface sediments consist mostly of aragonite that has been reworked from aragonitic sediments deposited at least 100 years ago.
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Bjarne Rafaelsen
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Location: Harstad

PostPosted: 13 May 2008 07:51    Post subject: Microcodium: An extensive review and a proposed non-rhizogen Reply with quote

Pavel Kabanov, Pere Anadón and Wolfgang E. Krumbein 2008: Microcodium: An extensive review and a proposed non-rhizogenic biologically induced origin for its formation. Sedimentary Geology, Vol. 205, Iss. 3-4, Pages 79-99.

Here a review of the available literature and the presented data reveal two peaks in Microcodium abundance; the Moscovian–early Permian and the latest Cretaceous–Paleogene. The authors propose a model of Microcodium formation involving an mycelial saprotrophic organism responsible for substrate corrosion and associated bacteria capable of consuming acidic metabolites and CaCO3 reprecipitation into the Microcodium structures.
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Bjarne Rafaelsen,
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Bjarne Rafaelsen
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Joined: 14 Mar 2004
Posts: 325
Location: Harstad

PostPosted: 29 Apr 2009 10:44    Post subject: Controls on carbonate platform and reef development Reply with quote

Controls on carbonate platform and reef development, SEPM Special Publication No. 89, edited by Jeff Lukasik and Tony Simo.

This book contain a range of interesting papers covering a wide range tools used from locations around the world.

http://www.sepm.org/books/toc/sp89toc.htm
or
http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/gsl/publications/bookshop/page4139.html.
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Carbonate Network Administrator
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Bjarne Rafaelsen
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Joined: 14 Mar 2004
Posts: 325
Location: Harstad

PostPosted: 23 May 2009 21:56    Post subject: Endogenic carbonate sedimentation in Bear Lake Reply with quote

Paper of interest to Quaternary lacustrine carbonate folks.

Dean, W.E., 2009, Endogenic carbonate sedimentation in Bear Lake, Utah and Idaho over the last two glacial-interglacial cycles, in Rosenbaum J.G. and Kaufman, D.S., eds., Introduction to Paleoenvironmental Changes at Bear Lake, Utah and Idaho, and Its Catchment: Geological Society of America Special Paper 450, Boulder Colorado, Geological Society of America, p. 169-196.
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Bjarne Rafaelsen
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Joined: 14 Mar 2004
Posts: 325
Location: Harstad

PostPosted: 29 Aug 2009 08:20    Post subject: Deep-water Coral Reefs Reply with quote

Deep-water Coral Reefs: Unique Biodiversity Hot-spots by Martin Hovland (Hardcover - 1 May 2008).

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Deep-water-Coral-Reefs-Biodiversity-Springer-Praxis/dp/1402084617/ref=sr_1_1/277-3923673-8175850?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1251527474&sr=1-1
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